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  Book of Psalms
  Who Wrote the Psalms?
  David Wrote Half the Psalms
  David's Authorship Questioned
  A Psalm of David
  Sons of Korah
  Asaph
   Biography of David
 

 
  Psalms Structure
  What are the Psalms?
  Five Books in Psalms
  Psalms Book I
  Psalms Book II
  Psalms Book IV
  Psalms Book V
  Psalms Divisions
  Psalms elsewhere in the Bible
 

 
  Terminology
  Acrostic or Alphabet Psalms
  To the chief Musician
  Michtam
  Maschil
  Shushaneduth
  Selah
  Book of Human  Emotions
  Psalms & Christianity
  Psalms & Judaism
 

 
  Psalms Trivia
  What are the paths of the sea?
  David Visited by Jonathon
  Mary, Queen of Scots & Ps. 11
  Ps. 19 ahead of science
  John Wesley and Ps. 46
  Luther song based on Ps. 46
  Ps. 51 a favorite of John Bunyan
  Ps. 84 sung by martyrs
  Hymns Inspired by Psalm 100
  The Priest King
  Who was Melchizedek?
  The Hound from  Heaven
  Francis Thompson
 

 
 

 
 

Book of Psalms
 

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15
16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30
31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45
46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60
61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75
76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90
91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105
106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120
121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135
136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 | 144 | 145 | 146 | 147 | 148 | 149 | 150
     
     
     
 

Psalm 2

 
     
King James Version
1 Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing?
2 The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the LORD, and against his anointed, saying'
3 Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us.
4 He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the LORD shall have them in derision.
5 Then shall he speak unto them in his wrath, and vex them in his sore displeasure.
6 Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion.
7 I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee.
8 Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession.
9 Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel.
10 Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth.
11 Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice with trembling.
12 Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.1
 

Bible Commentary
1
The psalm begins abruptly with a picture of violent confusion. The heathen or idolatrous nations surrounding Israel are raging or in tumult. They imagine or deliberate on something that cannot be accomplished. All their purposes against God's government are certain to fail.2
2 The attitude displayed by the kings of the earth is that of determined resistance against the king of Israel. From the Hebrew word mashiach we get the word Messiah. It signifies literally, an anointed one.2
3 The rebels against God are represented as speaking out, expressing their desire to break the restraints imposed by Jehovah's authority.2
4 In contrast to the tumultuous picture of the nations, Jehovah is pictured sitting calmly, serenely, in the heavens, laughing at the vain attempts of the rebels. The inspired writer expresses the characteristics and attitudes of Deity in the language of human beings, so that men may understand. The idea suggested in laugh is further expressed by the words derision, wrath, and displeasure - all of which indicate the divine contempt for rebellion.2
5
God's seeming indifference will not last forever. God will eventually declare His purpose.2
6 God has set or firmly placed His king upon the holy hill of Zion in the city of Jerusalem.2
7 Jesus, the Anointed One, God's spokesman, speaks in turn, interpreting God's great declaration of His Sonship. He is no usurper; He holds the office as Messiah by His Father's decree. The decree implies (1) that Jesus is to be acknowledged as the Son of God, and (2) that His reign is to be universal. Jesus' resurrection from the dead uniquely proclaimed Him to be the Son of God.2
8 The relation between Jehovah and the Messiah is such that any request of the Son would be granted. The utter futility of any attempt of the rebels to overthrow the government of the Anointed One is emphasised. As heir, the Son inherits all things, and is thus able to share them with us as heirs together with Him.2
9 The rod of iron is symbolic of the sceptre of rulership. The Messiah's enemies will be completely subdued.2
10 Two ways lie before the rebels: either to continue rebellion, which will produce destruction, or to submit to the divine will, which will mean eternal happiness. The leaders are advised to recognise their duty to Jehovah and his Messiah, and to lend their influence to promoting it.2
11 The words fear and trembling suggest humble reverence mingled with awe in the realisation of the awful consequences of rebellion against the purposes of God. The word rejoice implies that there is joy in the worship of God.2
12 The psalmist advises those who rebel against the Messiah to recognise him as King and to submit to His reign. In the light of infinite love, God's wrath must eventually blaze forth against sin and consume those who refuse to accept the Messiah. But God's heart of love yearns for the salvation of Israel, and He has no pleasure in the destruction of sinners. With the words blessed are all they the psalmist closes with a beatitude pronounced on all who trust in Jehovah's King. Blessed are they who recognise their need for a saviour and put their trust in the Messiah.2
 

References and notes
1.  King James Authorized Version
2.  Seventh-day Adventist Bible Commentary  Vol. 3 pgs. 633-635
3.  The Messianic Psalms - www.lwbc.co.uk/messianic_psalms.htm
4.  Walking Thru the Bible: Psalms - http://fly.hiwaay.net/~wgann/walk_ot/psalms.htm

 

 

Music for Psalm 2

Click on image for song preview of Psalm 2. The music was composed in 1983.  Psalm 2 features on the CD album Sing Psalms unto Him.
 

 
  Download on iTunes

 

Bible Author

That David is the author of Ps. 2 is attested in Acts 4:25-27.  It is noteworthy that the early church designated the psalm the second psalm (Acts 13:33).2
 

 

 

Royal and Messianic Psalm

Psalm 2 is a royal psalm. The subject of this psalm is the establishment of David upon his throne, notwithstanding the opposition made to it by his enemies. However this psalm goes beyond David and points to Christ:
Verse 7 "I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee."
The apostle Paul in Hebrews 1:5 uses this precise verse in speaking of the person of Jesus Christ. This Psalm is about the King and fits the ministry of Christ perfectly
Verse 12 ... Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way
Christ as the man of destiny, the focal point of all history. God says that every nation, every tribe, every people, every individual will find its value or its lack of value in how it relates to the Son.3

 

 

Relationship with Psalm 1

Ps. 1 and 2 have a complementary relationship. As Ps. 1 celebrates the blessedness of the good man's life of meditation on God's law and the ultimate failure of the wicked, so Ps. 2 shows the futility of universal rebellion against the Lord and the blessedness of peoples that put their trust in the Son of God. Ps. 1 describes the two ways for individuals. Ps. 2, the two ways for peoples. Ps. 1 begins with a beatitude whilst Ps. 2 closes with one.2

 

 

Who wrote the Psalms?

The Psalms were composed over a span of about one thousand years. The earliest was by Moses (Ps. 90) in the 15th century B.C., and a couple appear to be contemporary with the Babylonian captivity in the 6th century B.C. (Ps. 126, 137). Classification of the psalms according to authorship:
Moses: Psalm 90
David: 73 psalms mostly in Books I & II
Asaph: Pss. 50, 73-83
Sons of Korah: Pss. 42, 44-49, 84, 87-88
Solomon: Ps. 72, 127
Heman, the Ezrahite :Ps. 88
Ethan, the Ezrahite: Ps. 89
Anonymous: 49 psalms4

 

 

Psalms Song Category

The Psalms Song Category is a great starting point for searching the songs which make up this music category. The song category page contains Daily Scriptures and easy links to song previews and song pages. The song pages include interesting background information and commentary about the songs and the Bible author. Sometimes there are links to related web pages including Bible Quotes, Sermons, Music samples, and Bible Puzzles.
 




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